Peak Design Everyday Sling 3L review: the best camera bag for street photography?

What’s The Best tests the Peak Design Everyday Sling 3L on the streets and peaks.

Peak Design Everyday Sling 3L

by William Lobley |

The Peak Design Everyday Sling 3L is an understated and discreet camera bag with a few surprises up its sleeve. What’s The Best’s William Lobley puts the Everyday Sling to the test, both on the streets and in a Scottish National Park. Read on to see what he found out.

Specifications
Capacity: 3 litres (approx. one camera with lens, plus one prime)
Size: Tapered: Width: 300mm/240mm (top, bottom), Depth: 120mm/100mm (top/bottom), Height: 190mm
Weight: 550g
Colours: Black, Ash, Midnight Blue
Pros Cons
• Flexible modular compartment • Fiddly to switch to hip carry
• Discreet and lightweight • No good for tele lens addicts
• Robust and waterproof
• Streamlines workflow on the street
• Shoulder and hip carry

Verdict: The discreet design and quick-adjustment features of the Everyday Sling allows me to stay focussed and anonymous in city crowds. Though it costs more than most, the positive effects it has had on streamlining my workflow make it worth the extra spend. It’s a near-flawless example of clever design that goes above and beyond the standard fare. If you’re looking for a new lightweight camera bag, look no further.

Build

Peak Design Everyday Sling 3L - Top down look
©What's The Best/William Lobley

• Tough external material

• Folding divider and carry straps

• Plenty of stretch pockets

Though small, the Peak Design Everyday Sling 3L is a tough little bag. Its outer layer is double poly-coated 400D nylon, a lightweight and durable material that protects against abrasion and rips. The material’s water resistance is reinforced via DWR (Durable Water Repellent) to provide a hydrophobic waterproof shell. All outer material is 100 per cent recycled, which is great news for sustainability. The hardware carried by the Everyday Sling is robust, as are the Peak Design UltraZips. These zips are also weather-resistant, as to not undermine the waterproofing of the material.

The main compartment has a three-litre capacity (no prizes for guessing that) and has two hook-and-loop panels to position the modular folding divider. This folding divider is origami-like - it works as a vertical divider but has a folding flap, providing two smaller compartments when needed, one above the other. The UltraZips open down the sides, allowing the compartment to open wide for maximum access. Two fabric hinges prevent the compartment from falling open and spilling items onto the floor.

There are two small internal stretch pockets next to each hinge, which can hold a strap and lens cloths. At the top of the main compartment, there is an additional long stretch zip pocket with three internal pouches, ideal for carrying extra batteries and filters. There is an external flat zipped front pocket with enough room to store a smartphone and a thin wallet.

Peak Design Everyday Sling 3L - inner pocket
Inner stretch pocket with organisation pouches ©What's The Best/William Lobley

There are four external anchor loops, called CordHooks, located at each corner on the underside of the Sling. Two anchor points can trap a closed zip, adding extra security against light-fingered miscreants in crowded public spaces. Additionally, each anchor point can connect to two straps (included) for additional storage. On each end of the external walls, there are large material loops that can fit a Peak Design Capture Clip.

The body strap has a quick-adjustment buckle, allowing the Sling to be tightened and loosed in seconds, and a lightly padded shoulder pad to provide comfort throughout a day of shooting. For waist carry, the shoulder strap is folded away into a back channel of the Sling. A secure clasp connects the newly configured waist belt.

Usability

Kit carried in Peak Design Everyday Sling 3L
Everyday carry kit for street photography ©What's The Best/William Lobley

• Ideal for compact kits

• Low-profile discrete look

• Option to hip carry

I’m primarily a street photographer and I like to head out regularly, travelling as light as possible. My everyday kit consists of a Fujifilm XT-20 mirrorless camera and 35mm and 54mm prime lenses. I carry one additional battery, polarizing filter and a cheap rain bag. Because I’m paranoid and the UK is damp, about 12 silica gel packets are floating around in the mix, too.

For a small kit such as this, the three-litre capacity of the Everyday Sling is perfect. All in, the Sling and camera kit weighs only 1.5kg. There’s enough space to carry everything neatly, while the optional external storage straps allow for the occasional outing with a raincoat or tripod.

As a small-bodied mirrorless, the XT-20 sits just underneath the bulge of the inner pocket, so there’s minimal risk of crushing one way or the other. The depth of the Everyday Sling also allows me to quickly store the XT-20 vertically when carrying the 54mm lens with its 1.5-inch lens hood still attached.

The folding divider is handy. Most of the time it's used as a simple divider, but I have been able to fold it down when travelling to provide extra storage for loose cables, wrist straps and a card reader. It also provides me with peace of mind, knowing that the setup isn’t going to require any reconfiguring once I finally add a 23mm prime to my kit. Those who shoot with chunky primes and telephoto lenses will probably want to opt for a higher capacity Everyday Sling.

While my kit hasn’t called for using all of the internal pockets, the ones I have used have helped me stay organised while out on the street. I've used the external pocket for the carry straps mostly, as its low profile somewhat limits its potential to smartphones or wallets - both of which I prefer to carry on my person.

For 90% of the test, the Everyday Sling was set for shoulder carry. The quick-adjustment buckle allows you to find the perfect fit without a fuss and for it to loosen quickly to access the main compartment. The waist carry is just as easy to use, though the configuration can be a little fussy to set up - the shoulder strap needs to stow into a back channel, which is a tight squeeze.

Performance

Peak Design Everyday Sling 3L - shoulder, street photography
©What's The Best/William Lobley

• Comfortable and convenient

• Quick-adjuster is useful

• Suitable for streets and peaks

On the street, the Everyday Sling 3L is a discreet and valuable ally. Previously I had been using the Manfrotto Street CSC Pouch, carrying it inside a backpack. While this carry method still has its place, the Everyday Sling has streamlined my time shooting on the street. I no longer need to find a quiet place and a clean surface to change my lens - I pull the Sling to my front and open the compartment. It’s like having a portable workstation. It’s a comfortable Sling to carry, too. Granted my kit is pretty lightweight, but even after hours of wear, I felt no strain or points of friction.

In addition to removing obstacles from my workflow and being comfortable, the aesthetics of the Everyday Sling don't scream "photographer". Not only does this help me keep a low profile when shooting in urban environments, but it also makes me less of a target for would-be crooks. Once my camera is away, I’m just a guy with a bag.

Peak Design Everyday Sling 3L - waist belt, hiking
©What's The Best/William Lobley

Though fiddly to configure, the Everyday Sling performs just as well as a waist pack. Though a little dorky for street work, this carry method is ideal for short hikes. The Sling joined me in Loch Lomond National Park, Scotland. Here, I carried the Everyday Sling around my waist, sitting just underneath a 28L backpack. Once I was used to the new weight distribution, I could forget about the Sling until needed, with no detriment to my manoeuvrability or overall comfort (or discomfort as it may be - some of those Scottish slopes are pretty steep).

It was also on the hike that I placed my trust in the robust materials. When I stopped for a break, it was removed and rested on damp, rough ground. It scraped on rocks, shuffled through bracken and thistles, and stood up to the muddy splashes of water-logged Scottish bogs. All I had to do was wipe the mud off, and it looked as good as new.

I have used the optional carry straps to carry a waterproof jacket on both the street and hillside. My waterproof did break free from its confines once, but this was my fault, as I hadn’t provided enough overhang and one strap just slipped off when I was running down some stairs. I’ve had no issues since. The straps are very secure, and I would have no qualms about carrying a tripod using this method.

Price

Peak Design Everyday Sling 3L
©Peak Design

Read more: The best camera bags for photographers

The Everyday Sling 3L retails on the Peak Design website for £58.79 (not including postage). The camera bag is also available at Wex for £65 and on Amazon UK for around £80 (usually from third-party sellers). There are many other sling camera bags on the market, typically priced between £20 and £40.

At first glance, a blanket price comparison can make the Peak Design Everyday Sling 3L seem expensive. However, when it’s in your hands, the quality of the product, its versatility and its unique modular design show that it is worth every penny. I’d go so far as to call it a bit of a bargain.

Verdict

The Peak Design Everyday Sling 3L is a surprisingly complex little camera bag. Its main compartment can be configured for many photography needs and setups, while its stretch pockets provide ample organisational opportunities. The option to attach external carry straps adds even more versatility, as does its compatibility with Peak Design Capture Clip. Wearable over the shoulder or around the waist, the Everyday Sling adapts to suit the environment, and its tough exterior means it’ll stand up to plenty of use and abuse.

As someone who spends their time photographing the street, its discreet design and quick-adjustment features hold the main appeal, as it allows me to stay focussed and anonymous in city crowds. Though it costs more than most, if not all, of its competition, the positive effects it has had on streamlining my workflow make it worth the extra spend. The Everyday Sling 3L is a near-flawless example of a smart and understated design that goes above and beyond the standard fare. If you’re looking for a new lightweight camera bag, look no further.

Score: 4.5/5

Pros Cons
• Flexible modular compartment • Fiddly to switch to hip carry
• Discreet and lightweight • No good for tele lens addicts
• Robust and waterproof
• Streamlines workflow on the street
• Shoulder and hip carry

Peak Design Everyday Sling: 6L & 10L

The three-litre version of the Everyday Sling is the smallest in the range. The six-litre version of the Everyday Sling (£73) comes with two folding dividers, a can carry more lenses or a drone. There is also a padded sleeve for a tablet (up to 11-inches). The 10-litre Everyday Sling (£109) has more space, more pockets and a laptop sleeve (up to 13-inches), though it cannot be worn as a hip bag.

How we tested it

The Peak Design Everday Sling 3L is a personal purchase made to streamline my time photographing out in the real world. The Sling has been used for four weeks. Most of the testing took place during sessions of street photography using the over-the-shoulder sling configuration. These sessions ranged in length, from 30 minutes to four-plus hours. Weather conditions varied.

The Sling also joined me for hikes around the Loch Lomond National Park, Scotland. Here, I carried the Everyday Sling around my waist, sitting just underneath a 28L backpack. The hikes were typically between seven and 10 miles. Strangely for Scotland, though the ground was damp and bogs... boggy, weather conditions did not vary and hikes were undertaken in glorious sunshine.

Find out more about how we test here.

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William Lobley is a Senior Content Writer and reviewer for What's The Best, specialising in technology, gaming and outdoors. He also writes for Empire Online.

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